A Shalom-Inspired Cowl

 My Shalom cardigan is done! Well, except for the buttons. I used up every last bit of the Twiggy with just enough yarn left to weave in the ends. I found one never used skein of the same yarn – but its no where near enough yarn for two sleeves. So my Shalom will stay a vest. Since Spring has yet to show its face around here, and to use up that last skein, I decided to make a Shalom inspired cowl.

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Using the same twisted stitch pattern as the Shalom I cast on 78 stitches. After 3 ridges (of garter stitch) I knit 25 rows and ended with 3 more ridges. I used larger needles -size 10 rather than the size 4 I used on the Shalom. While this cowl won’t keep the stiff winter winds out it will be perfect for the (hopefully coming) warmer, but still chilly, Spring days ahead.

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Baby Booties

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With a new baby in the house there has been a bit of knitting for our tiny one. I’m sure no one is surprised about that- except maybe that it took me nearly a month to start posting about them! These booties take no time at all and they use so little yarn that you can use up those tiny leftover bits from larger projects.

DSCN5548Both of these booties are knit from the same pattern: Simple Seamless Baby Booties (free on Ravelry or as found on the Blog of Joy). The only difference is size, which you alter through changing your gauge (either yarn weight and/or needle size). The worsted weight multi colored booties are newborn size, Molly has since outgrown these, while the bulky green booties fit Molly now at nearly 1 month old. My only recommendation is that you use a bind off with a lot of give so you can easily get around those tiny splayed out toes.

DSCN5581DSCN5586It’s also easier to put them on if you fold them over first.

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DSCN5553The more my older kids grow the more I can appreciate knitting tiny baby items even if they don’t get a lot of use. These booties fly off the needles so fast I’ll surely be knitting up another pair or two.

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A Wurm Hat {KCCO/ Yarn Along}

I decided to go ahead and knit myself a Wurm hat next, as it used up some leftover yarn bits I already have. Since I like Zanetta’s Wurm I followed her guidelines for the number of repeats and decreasing. I used size 3 needles and CO (my Rav page) only 88 stitches (instead of 112) because the yarn I used, Hayfield Ibiza in Hessian, held double, is quite stretchy. For the knit stripes I used a miscellaneous blue that I picked up, somewhere, sometime ago. It’s a bit thicker, being worsted weight yarn, and I think it’s likely an acrylic, and maybe cotton, blend.  I was going to do multicolored stripes but I didn’t have any other yarn that would work for this hat. Luckily, the remainder of the blue skein turned out to be just enough.  I do like these two colors together.

Given how chilly it is, inside and out, I skipped blocking and went straight to wearing. I’ll have to remedy that soon.

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Crafting for the Giving Season {KCCO/Yarn Along}

I’ve noticed that even though it isn’t Halloween yet, never mind Thanksgiving, a lot of stores have aisles of Christmas decorations on display. It seems earlier every year. While I don’t understand it I do find it to be a good reminder to get started on crafting gifts for the holidays. This way there’s a chance I might finish them all in time.

Now, for all my friends and relatives this will be a spoiler for somebody. I won’t say who but if you don’t want any clues to what you may be receiving this year then look no further.

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The Prismatic scarf (free pattern on Ravelry)  is great for those multicolored skeins. The colors are high lighted yet not over whelming. The pattern is a fairly simple 12 row repeat. I find a row counter to be a handy way to keep track of where I am between rows. I have a little ways to go yet so the scarf hasn’t been blocked.

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KCCO/Yarn Along {Reuse}

Sometimes the easiest way to have a new knit garment is to reuse a knit that’s already made. I was given a sweater and a pair of handmade socks that didn’t fit anyone in the family. Rather than tossing them aside I decided to turn them into something new. After removing the sleeves (sewing the armholes closed) and cutting the top of the sweater down into a waistband the sweater fit nicely as a skirt. The sleeves I made into legwarmers.

DSCN3536As for the socks I transformed them into wrist warmers. I cut off the toes, which were quite worn and darned once already anyways. Then I was able to unravel the socks. I left about an inch above the heel, before the ribbing. Using a small crochet hook I worked a simple bind off. This part is the wrist warmer’s bottom.

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{KCCO/Yarn Along} Cowl

DSCN8815There hasn’t been a lot of knitting going on around here; few stitches here, an occasional row there were all I had time for. Since I’ve been working in fingering weight yarn progress has been nearly unnoticeable for way too long! I needed a quick gratifying project – in other words: bulky yarn, large needles,simple pattern and for me! I had a single skein of Knit Picks Robin’s Nest Wool of the Andes, size 13 circular needles, and the Dolores Park Cowl pattern to jump off of (although I started larger for a looser cowl so the pattern is essentially cast on 72 stitches and knit (plus 5 rows of seed stitch to start and finish)). Just right to get me motivated. Ezra’s pullover (or this post) is coming along!

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Yarn Along :: On the Go-veralls

The other day I was sorting thru the hand-knits when I came across this Pebble Vest I originally knit for Ezra when he was 21 months. It fit him well but on the snug side. I thought I’d see how it fit on Ishmael (soon to be 9 months):

Just about perfect. And he looks so darn cute in it too!

Between the cuteness and the realization that the time period where he’ll happily wear any hand knit item I put him in is already rapidly growing short I knew I had to cast on something. And that made me think of these On the Go-veralls I knit for Noah way back when I first started knitting.

Suddenly it all fell into place- I had the perfect yarn stashed away just waiting for the right project.

The yarn is Mirasol- an alpaca and bamboo blend. It’s gorgeous. I just love the yellow and gray; it’s knitting up fast too. It will be interesting to see how complicated these seem this time around. Thus far it’s been way easier….maybe because this time around I  know that circulars come in different lengths.

Oh and what have I been reading? Lots and lots of Berenstain Bears.

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Darning A Sweater

In a few months I will have been knitting for 2 years (yay!). During this time I’ve had the fun, and challenge, of knitting a variety of items- mostly sweaters, hats and socks. Like this hoodie:

I haven’t had much experience darning – ok, until the sweater below I had no experience but it seemed doable and it would be a shame to let a perfectly otherwise nice sweater to unravel into oblivion.

The original problem was that the sleeves had become to long and tattered. I offered to fix that. Then seeing all the yarn I salvaged I figured I might as well fix the other holes with said yarn.

Sleeve- during- I started right in before I thought to take a before shot.

Here are a few before shots of the other damage:

An unraveling

A hole

A mess

and so on….Each spot was treated in a case by case basis. Not having darned before I made up my own approach. A few spots just needed a stitch, that had come apart and dropped, picked back up with a crochet hook and secured.

Larger holes required reattaching some yarn and picking up and re-knitting some stitches. For this I found double pointed needles to work best. Once the stitches where ready I either kitchener stitched the two sides together or wove them together trying to follow the same pattern of over, around and under as the knit stitches.

With the exception of the hole in last photo, the holes where rather easy to fix and weren’t too noticeable. The smaller the problem the easier and better looking the fix. Now the last section was mostly gone except for a few strands running across. I decided to pick up the stitches and try to knit back down – Incorporating the strands running across and weaving in the sides  with a tapestry needle. It required a lot of rebuilding and the salvaged yarn was a little rough but it came together- albeit a bit more visible.

The results:

Sleeves - bound off.

You can see that a few places look a bit wonky. I think blocking would fix it some although there’s no getting around the fact that it needed repairs. At the very least the holes won’t be growing any more.

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