Observation

The best thing about taking a nature walk (besides the obvious: you’re outdoors and taking a walk) is the ample opportunity for observation. Observing is a skill. Like any skill, observing takes practice to learn. We have to take the time to slow down and really look; make ourselves familiar with whatever it is that we’re observing. A nature walk  provides a plethora of opportunities to observe: leaves, flowers, feathers hidden off in the grass, rocks, trees, insects, animals, weather…. The more we observe the more we may notice: patterns, behaviors, where to look for a certain plant or for turkey feathers. As a keen observer we notice changes, ask questions and answer them.

Every season offers plenty of wonderful things to observe but fall is my favorite season. The cooler weather is inviting and reminds us of the harsher conditions soon to come.

Get out and enjoy it while you can!

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Ezra observes a spider during a walk back in September.

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In the meantime…

It’s a busy time of year, between wrapping up fall projects, homeschooling, and you know, just living life, there doesn’t seem to a lot of time for my many craft projects. Often, I end up just going to bed. What I’m saying is: I’ve only knit a few more inches of Molly’s poncho, and I haven’t worked at all on anything else!

Sometimes, that’s just the way it is. In the meantime, here is a clay creature Noah made. I wish I had some photos of his Lego animals he creates. Birds, dogs, cats, pigs…they’re quite cool. Maybe, if I ask nicely, he’ll make some for me to show you.

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Cold Hardy Veggies

The fall gardens are thriving, but it won’t be too long before the ground freezes. Until then I’m relishing every trip to the garden. Fresh (and free) veggies! I let the chickens into the gardens to help clean them up and give the top layer of soil a stir (to help kill off insects  that over winter there, like flea beetles). They did a surprisingly zealous job, pecking most of the greens down to the stems! It’s a trade-off I’m willing to pay. Still lots of carrots, celeriac, kale, beets and leeks to get in before it’s too late!

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Miss Molly Stark’s Offset Wraplan

 

DSCN8282Molly Stark is on the move! Crawling, climbing, cruising…she’s investigating the world. In front of the kitchen window is where Molly likes to stand and observe from. We’re in the kitchen a lot. The chickens, dogs and cats seem to always be hanging out around there too; I’m sure they’re quite amusing to watch.

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 I finished this sweater almost two weeks before Molly Stark was born. A larger version of this sweater she looks so cute in. The neck is a little too wide but I think she might grow into it and it won’t seem quite so loose. If you happen to be reading this and you think you might knit an offset wraplan I recommend making the neck opening a little smaller and cutting back on the number of buttons. Not by too many, buttons definitely add to the sweater, but it’s hard to find 9 and that many really isn’t necessary. I managed to find these pink ones with little gold lambs on them.

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This isn’t a sweater I made but here’s Molly Stark in her spot, looking out the window, anyways.

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sharing with KCCO and Yarn Along

Tokyo and Rio

DSCN8218Our new little piggies, Tokyo and Rio, joined us this past weekend. For now they’re in the extra stall in the chicken camper while we close in the front of the pole barn. Tokyo is the pinker female on the left; Rio is on the right, he has more of a gray to his shin. They’re both red Tamworths.

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In other piggie news: Singapore is getting big! She’s done a fine job of rooting up her pen. I’ll be able to expand the garden there next year.

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Slippers: Take 2

DSCN7811The Bed Ped slippers just weren’t looking right so I frogged them and started over. This time I’m using Grandma’s Knitted Slipper pattern. They’re knit flat with worsted weight yarn held double.

To be honest, I’m not sure which part of the slipper this is. Perhaps the toe?  The sole is knit separately and both pieces are sewn together.  I’m sure, with time, it will be apparent. For now I’m trusting the pattern and knitting on.

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sharing with

KCCO and Yarn Along